Down the Aisle of St Thomas

T-Minus 2 days

Then heading for China! I’m sure even though we have a pretty busy schedule, there will be lots of photo time.  I’ll be mainly in Hangzhou, so it’s research time to see what the list of ‘to see’ will be.  Wednesday of next week we’ll be on to Taiwan, in Taipei and Taichung.  Needless to say, exciting times.

Down the Aisle of St Thomas

I was actually on my way somewhere else (technically to a different cathedral) when I saw this on around the corner.  One great thing about walking places is you end up finding all sorts of different things along the way!  This place was actually closed when I got there, which was quite disappointing.  Luckily, though, the groundskeeper happened to be at the door, and hadn’t locked it yet.  Apparently someone else inside was poking around, and as he went down the hall to get them moving, I quickly sneaked in set up behind the doors to the hall. Better to ask forgiveness than permission, as I had to apologetically have him unlock the doors to let me out.  But, got the shot!

Aisle St Thomas William Woodward

Under the Arches of St. Patrick’s

Under the Arches of St. Patrick's

Updating the HDR Tutorial

Well with the new Lightroom 4 out, I’ve updated my process just a little bit, so I wanted to update the tutorial to be current.  I’ll probably keep the LR3 version up for a while too for a period of time that LR4 is still new.

Under the Arches of St. Patrick’s Cathedral

One thing I didn’t even think about visiting when I was planning my visit to NYC was the cathedrals. But one popped up on my radar, then I noticed that there were more in the areas of some of the other hot spots, so I decided to pop in when time allowed, and that turned out to be an AWESOME idea.  The other awesome thing, the new 10-24mm lens.  If you’ve been tempted by the idea I definitely recommend it, as it’s opened up a whole new angle (pun intended) to my shooting.  If you take a peak back at yesterdays picture, you’ll see that it opens up to better than 90 degrees, which is pretty awesome to see if you’ve never looked thru a lens like it. This here is St. Patrick’s Cathedral, right across the street from the Rockefeller Center. It’s a nice one-two combo trip if you’re in the area!

A nice little quote I just read, not sure if it exactly fits, but here it is none the less.

But great moments often catch us unaware – beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.

St. Patrick's NYC William Woodward

Yellow and Blue in the Cathedral

Yellow and Blue in the Cathedral

I was just wandering in and out of buildings this day in Mexico.  There seemed to be lots of places that were just ‘open’ for people to walk in.  Or at least no one told me I couldn’t go in to any of these places.  This old time cathedral had such a great color to the interior, and the shape and form of the room led me to capture this photo, with the stained glass glowing and casting color around the room.

Cathedral Mexico William Woodward

Engraving on the Doors at Sagrada Familia

Engraving on the Doors at Sagrada Familia

Intracacy would be an understatement when discussing a building with features like those at the Sagrada Familia.  These two massive entrances at the cathedral stood closed, with sculpted words adorning the outer panels of the Passion façade.  These words are all taken from the Bible, representing various languages including Catalan. You’ll also see certain words highlighted with gold, my favorite of which is Cel, if you can find it, meaning Heaven or sky in Catalan.  Three total entrances to the cathedral represent the three virtues, being Faith, Hope, and Love. Each also represent one part of his life.

Doors at Sagrada Familia Barcelona William Woodward

-wtw

Plaza de Armas, Cusco

Plaza de Armas, Cusco

I have to admit a mistake.  While looking up information about yesterday’s photo, I made an error about which building was the subject of the photo.  In my defense, there are two Cathedrals in Cusco with the same name, and there is even a mistake on the Wikipedia about the sites, as half of the article is discussing this location, and half is about the other.  Anyways, if you have a read of the post below, it’s corrected now and has some interesting information.

Late in the afternoon, the plazas buzzed with activity.  People in Mexico and Peru seemed to congregate in communal outdoor locations, especially in the mild winter (southern hemisphere, winter in May, fyi, I failed to think too much about that) afternoons.  The cathedral pictured here was completed in 1654, nearly 100 years after construction plans were made.  As with many Spanish buildings during the time, it was constructed on a two sacred sites of the Inca, known as “Suntur Wasi” and “Kiswarkancha.”

The fountain and Cathedral of Santo Domingo (also known as the Cathedral of Cusco), located in the Plaza de Armas.

Plaza de Armas Cusco William Woodward

-wtw

Santo Domingo – Coricancha

Santo Domingo – Coricancha

Cusco, Peru, was an interesting experience for me.  There was about half of the English speakers there as in Mexico.  I was invited to stay with a local, and he pointed me in the direction of some interesting attractions and showed me the door.  Outside, I was on my own.  Camera in hand, and a whole day worth of sight-seeing ahead of me, I optimistically ventured around the city.  Being quite decent at map reading, I had little trouble finding out where I needed to be, that is as long as the map had enough detail to point me to where that was.

If you click to see the large size of this photo, you may notice that there is two very distinctly different styles of stone work.  That is because the Spanish built this cathedral on the Inca site of Coricancha (golden courtyard), originally the foundation of Inti Kancha, or Temple of the Sun.  This temple is considered to be one of the most important to the Inca empire, once saw its walls and floors covered in sheets of solid gold, and the courtyard filled with golden statues.  Reports from the Spanish tell that the site’s opulence was “fabulous beyond belief.”

A street level view, taken over the “sacred garden,” the Cathedral rose out of the large lot in the city.

Santo Domingo Coricancha William Woodward

-wtw

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