I’ve Got the Blues

I’ve Got the Blues

Not really, actually I’ve just been trying to find the time to make sure that there is a new photo up every day.  Between starting a new job, rugby, and the other general day to day, I’m running out of time!  I really appreciate now the time that I had off of work, being able to really throw myself into photography and being able to go out and shoot or sit and process photos at any time.  I will still do my best to have a new photo every day though.

Back to the fun stuff, I decided to go a little creative on this one, because of how much the blue really was the part of the photo that made this photo pop.  A room with a view, taken at Parc Guell in Barcelona.

Got Blues Barcelona William Woodward

While I was working on this photo, I also looked back and re-visited “The Blue Room” and really like the way it came out this time around.

Got Blues 2 Barcelona William Woodward

p.s. I was on my way into work this morning, perfect setup for a photo, and like I’ve been saying, always have your camera (wow this is a terrible sentence…) and passed a great scene.  So I quick turned round to get back to it, and took a few sets of photos.  They looked great on the screen, so I’m excited about getting them on the computer to develop.

p.p.s. I’ve decided to call it develop instead of process… It’s sounds more photographic.  Even though I am not using a darkroom, I am using ‘Lightroom,’ so it counts.

-wtw

Engraving on the Doors at Sagrada Familia

Engraving on the Doors at Sagrada Familia

Intracacy would be an understatement when discussing a building with features like those at the Sagrada Familia.  These two massive entrances at the cathedral stood closed, with sculpted words adorning the outer panels of the Passion façade.  These words are all taken from the Bible, representing various languages including Catalan. You’ll also see certain words highlighted with gold, my favorite of which is Cel, if you can find it, meaning Heaven or sky in Catalan.  Three total entrances to the cathedral represent the three virtues, being Faith, Hope, and Love. Each also represent one part of his life.

Doors at Sagrada Familia Barcelona William Woodward

-wtw

Shapes and Colors of Antoni Gaudí

Shapes and Colors of Antoni Gaudí

The Basilica and Expiatory Church of the Holy Family, commonly known as the Sagrada Familia, is a famed work of the the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí.  Taking over production in 1883 after groundbreaking in 1882, Gaudí transformed the building with his engineering and architectural style, combining themes from Gothic and curvilinear styles, as well as his own naturalism which drew much influence from “Art Nouveau.” The work became his final devotion of his life, ending in 1926, only a quarter into the completion.  Today construction still wages on, with certain parts of the cathedral open to viewing by the public.  The magnitude of the building is a difficult thing to portray, because everything is just so large.  Taken of the massive pillars supporting the roof, the late afternoon sun pierces thru and casts brilliant colors across the stone.

Antoni Gaudí Spain William Woodward

Single RAW HDR, Barcelona, Spain. – June 2010

-wtw

Inspiration

Inspiration

There are a few things that always seem to bring me a feeling of inspiration; time spent with my family, time in the outdoors, music, quotes, and sometimes a photo.  It’s been a great couple of days spent with everyone for Thanksgiving, with the count for the family get together on Thursday around 35.  That’s a lot of relatives running around one house, but lots of food and warm hearts made for a happy day.

A quote I heard recently that made me think about the future, about the past, and about today.

I’m not afraid of dying, I’m afraid of not having lived enough.

It’s hard to always know what actions that you take today will be remembered, or what will fade off into the past.  This picture was taken in Barcelona, Spain, at Parc Guell.  What may be behind the next door?

Inspiration Barcelona William Woodward

La Sagrada Famialia HDR

La Sagrada Famialia HDR

I’ve really enjoyed having a lot of time to put into my photography since I’ve been home.  Suprisingly, I haven’t even been able to put my camera down since being back in the USA.  I thought after having it around my neck for so long that I would need a break, but I see new things every day that I want to photograph here.

This picture was posted in it’s original form back in the Spain post, if you have an interest in seeing what really the HDR technique can do to a photograph. I love the way the colors in the stained glass are emphasized, while the texture and intricacies of the stones surrounding can be shown off as well.

La Sagrada Famialia Barcelona William Woodward

Barcelona – End of June 2010

Barcelona – End of June 2010

The city of Barc(th)elona.  Apparently to live in Barcelona there is a stringent lisp test.  Pronouncing it Barthelona is standard.  I don’t know why, but I went along with it.  It’s such a big city!  It would be a serious task to try and see everything that the city has to offer, but the only thing you can do on a limited time frame is enjoy what you get while you can.   You know, I guess that is true of more than just sight seeing.  It’s true of the time frame that everyone lives with.  We’ve all a finite number of grains of sand in our hourglass, and ksomeday those sands will stop falling.  Not too long ago I can across a saying.  “j.k. livin; the j is for just, the k is for keep.”  Simple words that I really enjoy.

Anyways, back to Barcelona!  I thought I was done with Spanish when I left Peru, but forgot about Spain… Actually they don’t speak Spanish in Barcelona, they speak Catalonian, a sort of spin off of Spanish, but not the same.  First stop, the Sangrada Familia, a Roman Catholic church that has been under construction since 1882, under the design of Antoni Gaudi, and is not expected to be completed until 2026, coincidentally the 100th anniversary of Gaudi’s death.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Only this year, a portion of the inside of the temple was opened for public tours, and based on what we were able to see inside, it will be something worth going back for in 16 years for the true experience, the way it was envisioned.

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Gaudi’s architectural style was extremely influenced by mathematical structures such as hyperboloids and paraboloids, as well as seeking a strong connection with nature.  Gaudi was quoted on his view of nature:

Those who look for the laws of Nature as a support for their new works collaborate with the creator.

He spent over 10 years planning the Sangrada Familia, with the most famous planning structure being a 1:10 scale model.  Not your ordinary model, though, this one was a little different.  Gaudi hung chords from where the columns were to be placed, then added small sacks of sand, each weighing one ten thousands (!) of what the arches were to support.  Then, taking photographs from different angles and turning them 180 degrees, he was able to determine, based on the lines of tension of the model, what the reciprocal lines of pressure of the compressed structure would be!  (there is the engineer coming out)

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Being a devout Catholic, he designed it to have 18 towers, 12 for the 12 apostles, 4 for the 4 evangelists, one for Mary and one for Jesus.

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The St. Joseph market, definitely one of my favorite stops in Barcelona (i like food).  So much so that I had a return visit the next day.

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I’m a photography rebel without a cause.  Why no pictures though?  If I spoke Spanish I would have asked.  Como no photographia?  That’s not right…

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Imagine the meals you could prepare if you could just hop into a place like this on your way home from work.  Pretty busy this day, though, as it was the weekend.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Tell me that these don’t look like the best Muscles ever, because they were.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Cutting some deliciously thing slices of pork from a leg.  These wooden contraptions were in most restaurants, providing a stable grip on the leg.  Spain is quite famous for it’s curing and aging techniques for ham, with a certain type needing to be cured in the north winds of the Sierra Nevada, at no less that 1200m above sea level!

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Now that is a load of seafood.  Anything could be found here.  I mean anything.  Do brains tickle your fancy?  How about Ahi tuna fish heads?  Skinned goat heads on the soup menu for the evening?  Well then stop on by St. Joseph’s Market for all your goat head needs.  If I were to try and put up all of the pictures of the weird things that were in this market, you would quit reading a quarter of the way thru.  Anyone who wants to see can sit thru the 4166 photos that I’ve taken over the last few months! *Disclaimer, this value does not include what I’ve taken here in Romania and what I will take while in Ireland.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

One of the public beaches on the coast of Barcelona, all of which are top’s optional.  The sands here were quite coarse, and the water a bit crisp, but on a hot summer day, it definitely hit the spot.  I have another story about topless beaches that I’m saving for a later post.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Quite a long way up heading towards Parc Güell, where Gaudi lived.  I would not have wanted to make that trip often before the escalators that you see here had been put in.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Tony (Antonio) and I enjoying a stellar view over the city of Barcelona, at the planned sight of the cathedral that was to serve the park.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Tara up top with me, and in the background you can see the massive size of the Sagrada Familia, the second structure from the left.  As I said before, this city is unforgiving in its size.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

A view of one of many ceiling mosaics underneath the main court of the park, all of which was supported by these columns.

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Getting into the music, España style.  This guy was playing so fast, that at 1/30th of a second shutter speed (.033 seconds), his fingers were still blurry.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

One of the buildings and mosaics of the park.  An interesting note about Parc Güell is that it was actually planned to be a 60 home luxury community.  Ultimately, only two of the houses were built, but neither of which were designed by Gaudi.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

A view up the stairway, where the iconic lizard of the park sits.  At the top of the photo, you can see the huge columns from before, supporting the main court above them.

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Very cool stairs and door in the “blue house” as I’ve decided to call it.

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And finally the lizard I spoke of earlier.  You have no idea how hard it was to get a photo without people all over this thing.  I think everyone and their brother, sister, grandma, and ex-cousin in law wanted to sit, put their hand on the lizard, and take a picture.  I propose a 5 min break every hour, no sitting near the lizard, and let people who don’t want some random person in their picture a chance to get a photo of this piece.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Some more of the intricate mosaic on nearly every surface throughout the park.

Barcelona - End of June 2010

From the looks of this bridge, I have no idea how it is still standing.  Very cool stone-work none the less.

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The Plaza España, near a huge park in central Barcelona.  At night there is another fountain that does a cool light & music show.  Unfortunately, that wasn’t in the cards for this trip, but I hear it is stunning.  Maybe if I’m “in the neighborhood” again, ha!

Barcelona - End of June 2010

Next post I promise I’ll write about my thoughts and observations over the last weeks.  I like showing off pictures, though, so sometimes they get priority.

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